Categoria: Investigação

Autores: Duarte F., Silva JN., Ramos C., Hopper C.

Referência: Measurement of Occlusal Force in Orthognathic Surgery using Force Sensing Sensors
International Journal of Dentistry and Oral Health 2021; 7(8):94-108
ISSN: 2471-657X

Resumo: Purpose: This study was designed to apply alternative and innovative methods of measuring muscle area, volume, structure, function and fibre orientation to a situation where adaptation of muscle is pivotal to the success of a therapeutic approach. 
Materials and Methods: Ten patients attending the combined orthodontic/orthognathic surgery clinic at the Clitrofa – Centro Médico, Dentário e Cirúrgico, in Trofa – Portugal were tested according to the following protocol:
a) Bite Training Machine: The occlusal contact area indicator was placed between the upper and lower dental arch, and the subjects were instructed to bite as forcefully as possible for about 3 seconds. The values were visualized in the dynamometer and the procedure was repeated after 10 minutes until the patient felt comfortable.
b) Occlusal Force Diagnostic System: The system was placed between the upper and lower dental arch, and the subjects were instructed to bite as forcefully as possible for about 3 seconds. The values were registered (T0) and the procedure was repeated after 10 minutes (T1), and 1 month after surgery (T2). In this study, the bite force and occlusal pressure were measured for 10 patients twice by two different observers. These 10 patients were scheduled for a bimaxillary osteotomy involving a combination of maxillary Le Fort I impaction procedure coupled with a sagittal split advancement of the mandible.
Conclusions: When comparing pre-op (Times 0 and 1) and post-op (Time 2) data, significant statistical differences have been found in the mean bite pressure measured by FSS sensor Q3/P3 located in the anterior region of the maxilla/ mandible (p < 0,05), those differences being absent in the remaining FSS sensors Q1/P1, Q2/P2, Q4/P4 and Q5/P5 (p > 0,05). Significant differences (p < 0,05) have been identified between certain pairs of FSS sensors, allowing the definition of a three-pressure region model where the key-factor seems to be the relative distance of the sensors to the occlusion region: the higher the distance to the occlusion region, the lower is the mean bite pressure (psi).

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